Peer Lending

Peer LendingIntroduction:  After several years of net losses, they reported a minimal gain of $1,343 through the third quarter of 2012.  The difference between secured and unsecured loans is the collateral involved in the loan.  The two different types of loans are secured by collateral and not secured by any collateral.  This is often called a signature loan.  There are different ways to borrow money.  This is behind the pace of last year when they reported a gain of $6.8k through the third quarter.  Additionally, the CU would be even further behind the pace of last year had they correctly expensed the TCCUSF expense during the third quarter of 2012 (they report no expense).  Improvements in profitability were noted in: loan income (up $7.6k) and other income (up $12.7k), while reductions in profitability were noted in: investment income (down $9.2k), employee compensation/benefits (up $4.8k), total other operating expenses ($6.8k), and PLLL expense (up $15.1k).  Peer lending is the answer.  Delinquency at 0.51% is below average, but charge-offs are somewhat elevated at 0.86%.  Reportable delinquency is composed of only $18.6k; however, the $201.7k of non-reportable delinquency is a potential concern.  The ALLL account currently has a balance of $66.3k.  For more information, check out one of the following sites:

http://secureonlineloans.com/difference-between-secured-and-unsecured-loans/

http://secureonlineloans.com/different-ways-to-borrow-money/

http://secureonlineloans.com/i-need-to-borrow-money/

Their average yields on loans (6.57%), investments (0.82%), and fees (0.41%) are all near the peer average; however, the average yield on loans decreased by 90 basis points over the past quarter.  Their NIM is rather high at 4.61% due to exceptional loan volume, with a loan/share ratio of 99%.  Loan volume increased by over $575k in the past quarter, an increase of nearly 19%.  I need to borrow money online right this moment.  Virtually the entire increase was in used vehicles.  With the increase in used car volume, plus the significant decrease in the average yield on loans, the CU probably ran a low interest, used car loan special.  Operating expenses represent 4.17% of average assets, well above the peer average.  Liquidity has tightened significantly, from 34% last quarter to 17% this quarter.

Body:  Three negative risk parameters were exceeded: consumer loan growth > 100% of NW (180% annualized), CAMEL 3 for > 36 months (39), and loan growth > 35% (45.90% annualized).  The loan growth was already discussed above.  This is not overly concerning at this point based on their delinquent and charge-off history.  However, their 1-2 month delinquency is elevated.

Conclusion:  Regular supervision through quarterly FPR/RR.  Keep an eye on loan growth.  Contact SSA about correcting Call Report for TCCUSF.

Bringing local folks, local knowledge and local resources together for hands-on learning experiences

The Sustainable Living Arts School is dedicated to sharing the skills and traditions we need to live sustainably, in the city and rurally. (Facebook Page)

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How to Get Free High Defintion TV

Ten years ago, I looked at my cable television bill and I decided that I had had enough. I multiplied my bill by twelve and thought of all the things that I could have spent a year’s worth of cable TV on. My family wasn’t ready to cancel cable and stop watching TV altogether, but we wanted to stop throwing our money away on all of the lousy content that was on most of the channels.  I knew there had to be some sort of alternatives to cable (and sure enough, I would find them later at http://getfreehdtv.com/alternatives-to-cable/)

Around the same time, the conversion of television stations from an analog format to digital broadcast was in the news, and it piqued my curiosity. The idea of receiving television for free was great, but I had major concerns about the quality. I had given up attempts to pull in a decent picture with an antenna decades ago, and I really did not ever want to try that again. But I dug a little deeper – what if the digital conversion meant that I could get a few high quality channels for free?  I had always heard of people using a rooftop or an attic antenna, but I had no idea if something like that would work.  Fortunately, I ran across http://getfreehdtv.com/attic-antenna/ which explained everything I needed to know!

How Good Is Free Digital Television?

After some research, I decided that over-the-air digital television is the most under-rated and under-appreciated technological breakthrough of our time. With a small, inexpensive antenna, most Americans can pick up dozens of channels in perfect high-definition.

Unlike the old system, which is no longer even broadcast, there is never any picture degradation or “snow” with digital television. 99% of the time, you either get the picture, or you don’t, so picture quality is rarely an issue. In fact, it has been shown that cable and satellite services actually compress their HD signals more than over-the-air broadcasters. The result is that my neighbors who pay for their television channels actually get a lower quality picture than the one I watch for free!  Clearly, these people are long-overdue to do what I did…cut the cord!

Another surprising benefit is the channel guide feature that you get with over-the-air digital television. Just like a cable or satellite program, a broadcast digital signal is encoded with information about current and future programs. Any compatible television or converter box should include a guide feature to display this information.  If you are looking for any additional information about how to reduce or completely eliminate your cable or satellite bill, go to http://getfreehdtv.com/cut-the-cord/.

Everybody is familiar with the basic idea of an antenna, but few people know how antennas actually work, or what the different types of antennas are.  Put simply, there are two different types of antennas, directional antennas and omni-directional attennas (often simply called omni antennas).  The Latin word “omni” means mean, so an omni antenna works best when you are trying to pick up signals from several different directions.  A directional antenna, on the other hand, works best for picking up signals from one general area.  Most people use a medium directional antenna.  In order to find the best medium directional antenna for you, visit http://getfreehdtv.com/medium-directional-antenna/

Herb Nerd Weekend- August 15/16

by

Robin

A note from Edible Landscapes on the Sunshine Coast -

Hi, all – I had marked August 15/16 as Herb Nerd Weekend, when a couple of herb instructors would be about doing their thing, and anyone could follow along, make tinctures, learn about infusions and decoction and do lots of plant ID. Meanwhile, a drought has moved in and the place is dry as toast. Many plants are not their usual selves. But there is still a great opportunity to hang out with Garliq and maybe Cymba and Lyrae and I, make medicine and chat till it gets dark about the plants we love to be with.

The weekend fee is $125. This includes camping, some plant matter, tincture bottles etc, and some food, and loads of learning and experiental opportunities.

There is a modest bus with sleeping platform and electricity for $15 a night and a camper for the same price. Friends or family can take in the beach, do some cycling or hang about the farm.

Please let me know by August 5 if you would like to attend – I can send a PayPal invoice which also takes Mastercard and Visa. info@ediblelandscapes.ca

Have a good summer, folks, and stay cool!

Robin

(www.ediblelandscapes.ca)

You are invited to a Bee Appreciation Learning Party

by

keiramc

You are warmly invited to another hands-on Sustainable Living Arts School Learning Party….

Bee Appreciation

….with master beekeeper Brian Campbell

Saturday, June 27 at 10am-noon.

Join us afterwards for a picnic in Clinton Park if you like. Bring the kids!

This learning party will happen in the Hastings-Sunrise Neighbourhood. Address will be emailed to the folks who register 3 days before the learning party.

Bee’s are the life’s blood of the environment. They connect plant life to animal life making abundance and creating a healthy ecology. For bees the city is the place to be. We provide a wonderful habitat of flowering plants and soil profiles that supports Canada’s greatest diversity of pollinators.

But all is not well. Bees and other pollinators are in decline around the world so our privilege of bee diversity is also our responsibility to protect and conserve. Because of development our bee populations are divided up and separated from each other. By connecting these population pockets we help to make bees more resilient and better able to help the stresses we throw at them.

In this learning party we’ll explore a backyard habitat and then make a bee’s journey through the neighbourhood helping to make bee corridors. Come learn about how to plant for bees, make bee condos and help make one neighbourhood more bee-friendly.

Our guide for the day: Brian Campbell

Brian Campbell is a certified beemaster and beekeeper, heavily involved in food security issues in Richmond and beyond. A member of the BC Association of Master Gardeners, Brian spent three years as seed manager for West Coast Seeds. Brian guest lectures for Gaia College’s Growing Food in the City certificate program, operates pocket markets in Richmond and teaches young people about honey bees as well as native types. He offers classes in grafting fruit trees, food preserving and other farm skills.

Register:

http://www.eventbrite.com/event/369963571

Location:

Hastings-Sunrise- details will be emailed to registered participants 2 days before the learning party.

By Donation:

Suggested donation is $25. Pay what you feel. Sustainable Living Arts School learning parties are 100% participant supported. Thank-you for your generous donations.

Children are very welcome with their grown-ups.

 

Comfort of Comfrey- Herb Workshop

by

keiramc

The Sustainable Living Arts School and the Living Medicine Project introduce the Living Medicine Series…

monthly Learning Parties dedicated to the study and art of herbal medicine.

These hands-on, half-day intensives will include Plant Identification, Gathering and Medicine Making. These 3 simple pieces are the tools required to know how, when and which plants can be gathered from gardens, parks and lawns to become food and medicines to keep our families and friends healthy.

Join us for the 3rd in this Series…

Cool Comfort of Comfrey

Sunday June 21st (Summer Solstice)

9am-1pm

Commercial Drive Area

**This is a family friendly event. Feel free to bring your kids. They’re much more likely to take the medicines that they help make.

suggested donation: $40 Pay as you feel

http://slas.ca/learning-party/pay-as-you-feel/

Donations will be split between SLAS, LMP and the facilitator(s)

Space is limited,

Register here! http://comfrey.eventbrite.com/

Information specific to the event will be forwarded to registrants on June 19th.

 

 

June 13/14 – Herb Weekend, SLAS, Roberts Creek

by

Robin

Please pass around where appropriate!

Two days of herb nerds! What could be better?

We’ll learn recognition skills, making basic medicines, native herbs, harvest and storage techniques and more $25 per class.- take one or take all. You can either pay by Visa or Mastercard via Paypal right away or mail her a cheque. 80% of student fees go directly to the teachers, with another 10% for preparing for classes and promotion. Attending these workshops is a direct way to support folks who live on the land and keep the skills and traditions of the sustainable living arts alive.

If you are part of a family or group of friends who would like to learn and practice together, get in touch with Robin to arrange group pricing.

Edible Landscapes is a place to come to reconnect, learn, relax and get inspired on how we can increase our self-sufficiency…together. You can camp on the land, hike to the ocean, walk in the woods, wander the gardens, browse in the edible and medicinal plant nursery and medicine emporium.

To register, contact Robin

at (604) 885-4505, or email (and she will invoice you via Paypal) – see details on other programs at

slas.ca or ediblelandscapes.ca.

June 13

10:00 – 11:30 Herb Recognition and growing methods with Robin Wheeler

Seeing a plant bursting with vigour and swaying under the weight of the bees, instead of just in powdered form or tincture, is a great reminder that we are working with an integrated, energetic being when we make medicine. See, smell and taste some of the over 150 varieties of plants here so that you will more easily recognize them in the future. Take photos or leaf samples as that can help as well. We will discuss growing methods for those wishing to grow herbs at home.

11:45 – 1:00 Intro to Botany for Herbalists with Garliq

This class is designed to navigate the world of Green, to know why a plant is what it is and not a ‘look alike.’ We’ll learn to answer a few basic questions about flower and leaf structures that will enable us to be sure we’re working with the medicine we think we are. Please bring samples from Robin’s plant walk to help apply this learning directly.

1:00 – 1:45 Lunch – brown bag or order $6 snack lunch.

1:45 – 3:15 TBA – hopefully Infused oils and lotions with Barb Cotgrave of Halfmoon Herbals.

3:30 – 4:45 – Harvesting and Storage Techniques with Robin Wheeler We will go outside and harvest leaves, stems and flowers, then go in and prepare them for drying. When we store herbs for any length of time, we want to use the best practices possible, know the problems that can occur and how to bypass them to retain high active levels in our medicine and culinary plants.

5:00 onwards – shared/potluck dinner.

7:00 – 8:30 Homeopathy and Herbs with Marlow Purves

Herbs and plants are a major remedy source in the homoeopathic pharmacopeia. The herbs that have been used traditionally for thousands of years find new and different application when potentised. Marlow will share some of the revelations of the remedies made from common herbs as a means of enhancing our knowledge, respect for and awe of our healing companions. We will likely try to potentize a herb for ourselves!

June 14

10:00 – 11:30 Introduction to Chinese herbs with Sarah Gilbert and Julie Starsage

Ancient Chinese systems are based on far different diagnostic criteria than we are used to, and the forms their medicines take, in terms of preparation and ingestion, are also new to us. Sarah will introduce us to herbs and formulas that have been appreciated for centuries, and give us a better idea of how they are used in modern times. 11:45 – 12:45 Wildcrafting Basics with Lyrae Emerson An examination of the methods of ethically harvesting wild and indigenous plants in a manner that minimizes impact on the population while maximizing their medicinal potential. We will look at tools, time of year to harvest roots, barks, stems and other plant parts, as well as look at how the practice of wildcrafting in itself can be a healing experience. Comes with take home instruction sheet on wildcrafting and harvesting guidelines.

12:45 – 1:30 Lunch – brown bag or order the $6 snack lunch.

1:30 – 3:30 – Making Plant Medicine with Lyrae Emerson Learn how to turn your raw or dried plant matter into finished medicines. Lyrae will discuss and show preparation of infusions, pills, teas and tinctures, show and share samples, discuss alternate procedures, and basically give a solid background so that people new to the field can go home and follow recipes with confidence.

3:45 – 5:00 Native Use of Herbs with Cymba

Consisting of in-the-field plant identification, discussing traditional and contemporary uses of these plants. Food, medicinal and ceremonial uses will be covered as well as ecologically sustainable harvesting techniques. A hands-on component will include topical salves making (everyone will leave with a traditional medicine).

Shared potluck dinner to follow for all who want to continue exchanging thoughts.

 

 

Growing Traditions: Sharing gardening knowledge across generations

by

Tricia

The elders in our community have abundant knowledge of gardening practices. My grandparents grew up on farms on the Prairies during the Depression. Growing food and composting were facts of life. But as this generation of gardeners retires to smaller homes, their knowledge is leaving us.

At the same time, so many people are getting excited about growing their own food. Maybe it’s the recession, or maybe it’s just time: new parents want to teach their children how to garden, and flower gardeners are starting to cultivate food as well.

This year, the Sustainable Living Arts School, in consultation with the

Edible Garden Project, is working on a small garden mentorship program funded by North Shore Health. The Growing Traditions project is a small pilot program designed to help us learn how elders and new food gardeners can share their knowledge. We would like to learn how garden mentorships work, experiment with how learning parties can support these relationships…and get families growing food!

A big thanks to

Stacey Friedman and all the participants of Intergenerational Landed Learning at UBC Farm who welcomed us to join them for a day of Landed Learning fun at the farm. We also took the opportunity to crash in on Diane Johnson, who managed UBC’s Trimentoring Program through its start-up years. They both asked great questions, created a context where we could ask what we needed and well, mentored us for a day.

The project is looking for experienced gardeners on the North Shore who would like to mentor newer gardeners. We’re also looking for families to participate – newer gardeners who would both contribute to and benefit from a community connection with an elder gardener. The mentorship would occur from June until the end of September. At the end families and elders will share their knowledge with their neighbors and friends by hosting a learning party.

Do you know anyone who would like to do something like this? Interested participants or those with any questions are welcome to contact Tricia at 604-842-3251 (please leave a message) or email

growingtraditions(at)slas.ca.

Invitation to Permie Primer Weekend- May 31

by

keiramc

Hello folks,

Some of us have big dreams while still picking up basic skills. This is a great weekend for those laying a foundation in simple living.

 

You are warmly invited to another Sustainable Living Arts School Weekend Retreat in Robert’s Creek on the Sunshine Coast (just 15 minutes from the ferry at Langdale.). Robin has got a bit more land than the average city grower, but whether you’re growing on a counter-top, balcony, patio or yard, Edible Landscapes is a place to come to reconnect, learn, relax and get inspired on how we can increase our self-sufficiency…together. You can camp on the land, hike to the ocean, walk in the woods, wander the gardens, browse in the edible and medicinal plant nursery and medicine emporium.

To reserve your space for the weekend away, email Robin

info@ediblelandscapes.ca If you are part of a family or group of friends who would like to learn some do-it-together skills together, get in touch with Robin to arrange group pricing. She’ll work out the details with you and send you an invoice.

You can either pay by Visa or Mastercard via Paypal right away or mail her a cheque. 80% of student fees go directly to the teachers, with another 10% for preparing for classes and promotion. Attending these workshops is a direct way to support folks who live on the land and keep the skills and traditions of the sustainable living arts alive.

Saturday, May 30th

9:30 – 11:00 – Basic Framing with ____TBA_____ - Sometimes we don’t realize until we are trying to construct a chicken coop, greenhouse or lean-to that we have no framing concepts. This class will go over the necessary skills to begin simple projects and problem solve on our own. $25

11:15 – 12:30 Garden Standbys with Robin Wheeler – What are the tried and true plants that every smallholder should have? How are they placed and cared for? We will look at the top groups of greens, tubers, berries and fruit and learn about their needs. $25

12:30 – 1:30 Brown bag, or order $6 snack lunch

1:30 – 3:00 –Tool maintenance and Repair with Cymba – Good tools are worth holding on to, and regular care will considerably lengthen their life. Cymba will show methods for caring for garden tools and chain saw, and will also show how to salvage old tools by replacing handles, and how to make a handle out of a found object or branch. $25

3:00 – 5:30 Essentials of Permaculture Design Part One : Ethics and Principles with Delvin – Together we will explore the basics of permaculture ethics and principles in the context of a permaculture site design. A great intro to the permaculture way and how it can be applied to your own life. $25

Sunday, May 31

10:00 – 11:15 – Woodshed/Woodstove Primer with Robin Wheeler – The goal with a home wood supply is to have sufficient, well dried wood that will burn cleanly, and to understand the basic physiology of a wood burning heater. We will look at placement and purpose of a woodshed, split some wood, and then go inside and learn the parts and purpose of a normal wood stove. We will learn the important components of the cleanest, most non-polluting burn possible. $25

11:30 – 1:00 – Irrigation Intrigue with Jason Woodall – Jason is a gentle guy who is going to pull out bits and pieces of irrigation, give them names and purposes, and then will have the group assemble and build a portion of water line. He will also talk about repair problems. Participants will feel much more confidant buying parts and assembling their own systems. $25

1:00 – 1:45 – Lunch – brown bag or order $6 snack plate

1:45 – 2:50 Water Wisdom with Robin Wheeler – There are many techniques for living with an unreliable volume of farm water. Robin will show methods for water collecting, swaling and mulching methods, and will discuss plant choice and using observation and planting schedules to make plants more resilient and “drought proof”. $25

3:00 – 5:30 Essentials of Permaculture Design Part Two : Mapping, Zones and Sectors with Delvin – This class can be independent from the first class though it is also the natural extension of it. Here we will look at permaculture site design with mapping using zones and sectors preparing you to do a permaculture evaluation of your own home and property. $25

 

The 10 X 10 Garden: A Hundred Square Feet of Permaculture

by

keiramc

Stay tuned for an upcoming learning party with Rin of the Farmhouse. In the meantime, check out this fabulous sounding workshop she’s offering around Vancouver over the next few weeks…

Do you want to grow more of your own food, but don’t know where to begin? Think you don’t have enough space? Are you interested in learning more about Permaculture and organic gardening?

If you have a 10 X 10 foot space and want to learn how to turn it into a full year of fresh, nutritious, yummy food without chemicals or hours and hours of work, this workshop is for you.

This one-day workshop with Rin from the Farmhouse Farm — an urban farm right here in Vancouver — will show you how to start from scratch and build a garden that will produce food all year long in just a hundred square feet! Vegetables, herbs, and greens are all a part of the comprehensive garden plan that you’ll learn to build and maintain. Perfect for those with small yards or working in allotment plots, this easy-to-follow plan incorporates Permaculture principles into a garden design you can follow to the letter or change and evolve to fit your space and goals. We’ll spend the day going over the plan and then getting down and dirty and building the garden from scratch at the host site. You’ll leave with a copy of the full garden design including crop rotations, maintenance routine, and all the information you’ll need to get started.

There are three chances to check it out:

Kitsilano: Saturday May 16th, 12.00 – 6.00 13th and MacDonald. Main Street: Sunday May 17th, 12.00 – 6.00 Ontario & 24th. New Westminister: Saturday May 23rd, 12.00 – 6.00 Edinburgh & 16th.

The workshop is offered on a Pay-What-You-Feel basis, with a suggested donation of $60 to $100.

For more information or to register, contact farmhousefarm(at)gmail(dot)com or go to

 

Dandelion Delight Learning Party

by

keiramc

The Sustainable Living Arts School

and the Living Medicine Project introduce the Living Medicine Series…

monthly Learning Parties dedicated to the study and art of herbal medicine.

These hands-on, half-day intensives will include Plant Identification, Gathering and Medicine Making. These 3 simple pieces are the tools required to know how, when and which plants can be gathered from gardens, parks and lawns to become food and medicines to keep our families and friends healthy.